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Fats…Good or Bad?

nuts

Great news!  Some fats are actually good. The secret is as long as we don’t eat too much of it. Nut oils are a great source of fat. If you are trying to lose weight, use them very sparingly. If you are trying to gain weight, they will make you feel better.

Nuts and seeds are not cleansing. They should be eaten after cleansing. Cleansing is good but you can’t cleanse all the time. That is when you eat nuts and seeds just not too much.

If you are eating a nice, healthy, diet, you don’t want your calorie count to get too low. Nuts and seeds can add calories when you need them. There are all different kinds of nuts to choose from. Some nuts have more heart-healthy nutrients and fats than others. From walnuts, almonds, hazelnuts, cashews to macadamia, every type of nut has a lot of nutrition packed into a teeny little shell.

If you have heart disease then eating nuts can be heart healthy. Eating nuts can lower the LDL, low-density lipoprotein or “bad,” cholesterol level in your blood.

“Many nuts are also rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3s are a healthy form of fatty acids that seem to help your heart by, among other things, preventing dangerous heart rhythms that can lead to heart attacks. Omega-3 fatty acids are also found in many kinds of fish, but nuts are one of the best plant-based sources of omega-3 fatty acids.”

Nuts also have fiber, vitamin E, plant sterols and L-arginine.

Here’s some nutrition information on common types of nuts. All calorie and fat content measurements are for 1 ounce, or 28.4 grams (g), of unsalted nuts.

Type of nut Calories Total fat
(saturated/unsaturated fat)*
Almonds, raw 163 14 g (1.1 g/12.2 g)
Almonds, dry roasted 169 15 g (1.1 g/12.9 g)
Brazil nuts, raw 186 19 g (4.3 g/12.8 g)
Cashews, dry roasted 163 13.1 g (2.6 g/10 g)
Chestnuts, roasted 69 0.6 g (0.1 g/0.5 g)
Hazelnuts (filberts), raw 178 17 g (1.3 g/15.2 g)
Hazelnuts (filberts), dry roasted 183 17.7 g (1.3 g/15.6 g)
Macadamia nuts, raw 204 21.5 g (3.4 g/17.1 g)
Macadamia nuts, dry roasted 204 21.6 g (3.4 g/17.2 g)
Peanuts, dry roasted 166 14 g (2g/11.4 g)
Pecans, dry roasted 201 21 g (1.8 g/18.3 g)
Pistachios, dry roasted 161 12.7 g (1.6 g/10.5 g)
Walnuts, halved 185 18.5 g (1.7 g/15.9 g)

*The saturated and unsaturated fat contents in each nut may not add up to the total fat content because the fat value may also include some non-fatty acid material, such as sugars or phosphates.

Enjoy your nuts knowing that they are healthy and good for you as well as tasty!

KarenDavis2013-1025

Karen Davis is a health coach, life coach, Reiki II practitioner, a Hormone Cure coach, aromatherapist, and a detox & longevity specialist.  Karen graduated from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition in New York City, The Life Coach Institute, and the Aromahead Institute. She is also certified by the American Association of Drugless Practitioners and has studied the Hormone Cure with Dr. Sara Gottfried. Her approach to health focuses not only on the foods you put into your mouth but also incorporates the elements of body, mind and spirit. She has a thriving health & life coaching practice.

To find out more about her programs visit http://www.HolisticWellnessForWomen.com

What’s so Super about Superfoods??

Goji Berries

As more and more of us shop at Whole Food Markets and have become aware of the importance of eating clean and organic foods we are naturally moving toward foods that have the potential to make us incredibly healthy!  Super foods are not new, as a matter of fact; they all go back to ancient times.  We are just rediscovering what our ancestors knew instinctively.

Super foods are natural food sources with highly concentrated, complex supply of high quality nutrients with the least negative properties. The magazines are pushing them as diet aids, the truth is they are not always low in calories, but, for the number of calories present, they are always high in nutrients.  They are an excellent addition to any healthy diet

Super foods should not be the only part of your diet.  A really healthy diet would include a combination of live, raw plant foods, super herbs and super foods.    Super foods can help nourish the brain, muscles, bones, organs, immune system and hair, skin and nails.  They also correct imbalance in the diet.  The ultimate goal would be to be able to quit taking vitamin and mineral supplements and actually get these nutrients from your foods.

Super foods include:

Acai

Algae

Aloe Vera

Bee Products

Cacao

Camu Camu Berry

Chlorella

Coconut

Goji Berries

Hempseed

Incan Berries

Kelp

Maca

Marine Phytoplankton

Noni

Yacon

Adaptogen:  A plant based substance with combined therapeutic actions in the human body.  An adaptogen strengthens and invigorates the system while helping the body to deal more easily with stress of differing origin by supporting the adrenal glands.   Adaptogens are believed to reinforce the non-specific power of resistance of the body against physical, chemical or biological noxious agents. They must also have a normalizing influence and may not be harmful or alter the bodies’ normal functions.

Antioxidants:  A substance that reduces damage due to oxygen.  Think rust or an apple turning brown.

HGH:  Human Growth Hormone, Growth hormone is produced by the pituitary gland to fuel childhood growth and help maintain tissues and organs throughout life.  Our growth hormone slows as we age.

Polysaccharides:    A carbohydrate whose molecules consist of a number of sugar molecules bonded together that fortify the immune system.

Sesquiterpenoids:  A class of Terpenes that have anti-inflammatory properties.  They increase production of HGH by stimulating the pituitary and penal glands.

Have questions?  Comment below or email us at info@lifeoficoaching.com

KarenDavis2013-1025

Karen Davis is a health coach, life coach, Reiki II practitioner, a Hormone Cure coach, aromatherapist, and a detox & longevity specialist.  Karen graduated from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition in New York City, The Life Coach Institute, and the Aromahead Institute. She is also certified by the American Association of Drugless Practitioners and has studied the Hormone Cure with Dr. Sara Gottfried. Her approach to health focuses not only on the foods you put into your mouth but also incorporates the elements of body, mind and spirit. She has a thriving health & life coaching practice.

To find out more about her programs visit http://www.HolisticWellnessForWomen.com

Changes I have made, yet to be made and current goals toward stress relief: A one year progress report!

KarenDavis2013-1044

Welcome! This is the written recording of my journey to an overall healthier lifestyle. I will provide you lists of references and books that have helped me to get where I am today. You can see my grand victories, my funny adventures and my silly mistakes. I am one year into my transformation and have made many of all of those. From accomplishments, funny stories and silly mistakes. The theme of my journey is progress not perfection. I am not expecting perfection from myself. I am striving for overall progress; slow and easy continuous progress.

These are the changes I have made to date:
1. Cut out pork & red meats
2. 75% raw
3. No processed foods
4. No processed sugars
5. No gluten
6. No caffeine
7. No soda

After a while I noticed other things that I was doing that are also unhealthy. My hair color, nail polish, deodorant, clothing fabrics, body lotions, face creams all became noticeable. I am a holistic health coach so I am very aware of the things in my environment that I should stay away from. I will go into further detail with a blog on those things at a later date. I am currently working on the things that I just listed. Vanity is preventing immediate changes in everything. I am working toward it though.

1. I switched my deodorant to an enzyme deodorant however; I am not impressed. Especially during the hot summer in a silk dress. So, if anyone has deodorant suggestions I would love to hear them. I am also looking into making my own deodorant (as long as it’s effective!)
2. I have given up chemical-filled hair colors. There are still hair colors available for use.
3. I love breathable polyester for workouts. I should reevaluate that. I have a natural tendency toward “real” fabrics like cotton, wool, linen and silk. I love the new hemp products that are available.
4. I love EO’s (essential oils) and am currently taking a course to help me understand the MANY valuable uses of EO’s and how to make products myself.
5. I try to stay away from all chemical cleaners. (LOL to be honest that is not a struggle for me.) But I am learning how to make healthy, great smelling cleaning products with EO’s! I do not dry clean.
6. I have learned quite a bit about how herbs can be used to prevent illness, keep our colds/flus from getting as bad as they would without them, and they don’t have any of the negative consequences that some OTC medicines do. I’ve made some great cough syrups, ginger candies and herbal lip balm. And I’m looking forward to having a whole medicine cabinet full of these great, homemade items!

I have my hands full with the food changes and stress relief. I am going to commit to making gradual changes to the list of 6 above. I will make more of a committed effort next year. I believe that it is a mistake to take on more than what we can reasonably handle. Again it is important to be realistic with ourselves and practice slow growth and betterment. One to thing things at a time.

Now that a healthy lifestyle is comfortable and natural, my main goal is to eliminate stress. I will continue to add one new recipe a week to my cache and learn from all my new sources. My main focus will be to relieve stress with the following:

1. Pinpoint the things that cause stress in my life by daily journaling and then going back and highlighting anything stressful in my day.
2. Continuing daily exercise of 30-60 minutes of cardio and 45 minutes 3 times weekly strength training.
3. Praying and spending a minimum of 30 minutes daily quietly with God.
4. Practicing Reiki and other stress reducing activities. (I am signed up for 10 yoga sessions; we will see how that goes.)
5. 30 minutes minimum daily learning, reading and growing spiritually.
6. Very limited political news.
7. Very limited television.
8. 1/2 hour daily reading and talking extra time with my loved ones.
9. 2 nights of dancing a week with my fiance.
10. Nightly walk after dinner.
11. Community contribution and involvement through my volunteer work with animals and veterans.
12. Steps to reduce stress in my business by eliminating stressful associations and relying more on trusted and reliable people.
13. Eliminating superfluous household items, furniture and people in my life.

I know that I have a lot on my list. Who would have ever thought that eliminating stress in our lives would have so many opportunities!

-written by Karen Davis
http://www.HolisticWellnessForWomen.com

Fat – The Whole Truth… Or At Least a Lot of Opinions

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Fat

In the book, Engine2 Engine, written by Rip Esselstyn, his assertion that we should avoid all fats, good or bad, because they have so many calories can get a little confusing.

Everything I have read about having a higher metabolism, balanced diet, good skin and antioxidants is that we need that good fat.

Dr. Hyman says…

“We should obtain the bulk of our antioxidants from food – namely whole, real, unprocessed plant foods. And we should take antioxidants as a team, not individually.

Whew! That’s a lot of biochemistry and physiology, and I really would go into so much detail if it weren’t so important.”

So here’s what to do to protect your mitochondria and prevent rusting.

  • Eat less processed, junk food, sugar and empty calories. In fact you should really avoid them altogether.
  • Detoxify – get rid of environmental and internal toxins
  • Address inflammation
  • Balance your hormones

Here are things to boost and protect your mitochondria:

  • Exercise – interval training increases the efficiency and function of the mitochondria, and strength training increases the amount of muscle and number of mitochondria
  • Eat whole real, colorful plant food – 8-12 servings of fresh vegetables, fruits, beans, nuts, seeds, whole grains every day full of antioxidants and phytonutrients
  • Take mitochondria protective and energy boosting nutrients such as acetyl-L-carnitine, alpha lipoic acid, coenzyme Q10, n-acetyl-cysteine, NADH, D-ribose, resveratrol, magnesium aspartate
  • Increase omega 3 fats to help build your mitochondrial membranes

Brendan Brazier says…

How important are fats, what forms should you be consuming and in what quantities? It wasn’t long ago when then medical community was advocating the avoidance of all fat, even in the form of nuts or an avocado. Long gone are the days of neglect and dismissal when it comes to fat. We have made great progress drawing more clear lines between raw plant based sources that are good for you, even anti-aging, and those that are harmful such as cooked, animal based, and processed saturated and trans fats.

Bad Fat

A deficiency of healthy fat runs prevalent throughout the modern day North American diet with the majority of people consuming too many of the detrimental bad fats including saturated fats in meat and dairy, and processed polyunsaturated fats or hydrogenated trans-fat from cooking oil and margarine used in processed foods. Consuming too many of these and not enough of the good fats contribute to stroke, heart attack, chronic inflammation, cognitive impairment, allergy, auto immune diseases and ultimately premature death.

Many of the oils we think are doing our bodies well are in fact causing further damage. The processing of oil can be the difference between good and bad. Some extraction methods for cheaper oils involve high heat, which can actually cause the oil to convert to trans fat. Other extraction methods use chemical solvents to separate the oil, usually done with low-grade oils.

Good Fat

The health benefits of consuming a sufficient amount of fat in the right forms and proper proportions has been shown to be immensely important in an endless number of areas impacting the state of body and mind. Among other things, it can strengthen the immune system, enhance brain and nervous system function such as mood, intelligence and behavior, greatly reduce cardiovascular disease, increase energy and performance, grow healthy skin, hair, and nails, regulate body weight, and improve organ and gland function.

Essential Fatty Acids

Omega-3 and Omega-6 are the two essential fatty acids (EFAs), “essential” meaning that the body cannot produce them — they must be ingested, by eating foods rich in EFA. EFAs are a type of fat known as long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and an important dietary component of overall health. Lending support to the healthy function of the cardiovascular, immune, and nervous systems, they also play an integral role in promoting cell health. Repair and regeneration of the cellular membrane is vital for keeping the body biologically young and enabling it to retain mobility and vitality throughout life. Contributing to our cells’ ability to receive nutrition and eliminate waste, EFAs help keep the cellular regeneration process moving. Our body’s ability to fight off infection and reduce inflammation is in part dependent on having an adequate supply of EFAs in the diet. In fact, healthy and efficient brain development in children has been linked to a diet rich in EFAs.

In addition, a balance of omega-3 and omega-6 EFAs are vital for skin health. Dry skin is commonly treated topically with a moisturizer, leaving the cause of the problem unaddressed. A diet with adequate EFAs will keep skin looking and feeling supple.

The present day American diet contains an excess of omega-6 by10 to 25 times with almost no omega-3. This imbalance among other things has been shown to contribute to stroke, heart attack, chronic inflammation, cognitive impairment, allergy and autoimmune diseases. Excellent sources of omega-3 to help restore the natural balance are flaxseed and hemp oil as well as walnuts.

GLA

Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) is a difficult to attain omega-6 EFA with potent anti-inflammatory properties via production of hormone-like substances called eicosanoids. These help soothe skin, promote healing and regulate water loss. GLA’s anti-inflammatory properties expand blood vessels enabling better blood flow. It is known as an immune booster, cancer fighter, cholesterol reducer, arthritis reliever and supple, beautiful skin. Evening primrose, borage and hemp seed oils are the best sources of GLA.

MCTs

Another healthy yet underrated fat are Medium-chain triglycerides, or MCTs, found in large amounts in coconut oil. They are unique in that they are a form of saturated fat, yet have many health benefits. Their digestion is near effortless and, unlike other fat, MCTs are utilized in the liver and are easier on the pancreas, liver, and digestive system. Within moments of MCTs being consumed, they are converted by the liver to energy which make it an excellent source of energy during an intense workout or race. It has been shown to promote heart health, a strong immune system, a healthy metabolism, weight loss and youthful skin.

PHYTONUTRIENTS

Healthy fats like raw unprocessed plant based oils also carry hundreds of phytonutrients such as chlorophyll, phytosterols, Carotenoids, Lignans (Phytoestrogens), tocopherols, tocotrienols, Flavonoids (Polyphenols) among others. Flax oil, for instance, when extracted properly can retain high levels of cancer fighting lignans, while hemp oil is rich in many phytonutients, in particular receiving a lot of attention for its high levels of immune boosting, alkalinizing, and cleansing chlorophyll.

Antioxidants

Plant based oils can also be a great source of antioxidants. Chlorophyll found in hemp oil has antioxidant like properties while berry seed oils are packed with antioxidants in a highly concentrated form. Raspberry, cranberry, and pomegranate seed oils are among the best. They can be hard to find in stores and are expensive, but they will deliver an extra dimension to a high-quality oil blend. A mixture containing all these oils is the ultimate essential fatty acid and antioxidant combination.

What to Look For:

A good fat should generally come from an organically grown plant based source with minimal processing to preserve their “raw”, nutrient rich state. Look for oils that are cold-pressed and have not undergone a distillation or purification process. Also try to avoid those that are exposed to heat and light as they can result in oxidation.

Hemp oil is a great base for salad dressings, sauces, shakes and many other recipes that do not require cooking at high heat. This is because hemp offers exceptional flavor and nutrition. Using only hemp oil as your primary oil source is a good way to go; however, a blend of about 80 percent hemp oil, 10 percent flaxseed oil, and 10 percent pumpkin seed oil is an optimal balance of essential fatty acids. Fats play a pivotal role in one’s health and longevity.

Hemp seed oil, flax seed oil, antioxidant oil blend (green tea seed oil, pomegranate seed oil, black cumin seed oil, black raspberry seed oil, blueberry seed oil, cranberry seed oil), pumpkin seed oil, coconut oil.

 

Dr Caldwell Esselstyn says…

Oils and Fats

Along with cutting out animal-based foods, this diet recommends eliminating all oils, including olive oil and canola oil. You also need to avoid nuts and avocados since these plant sources contain high amounts of fat. Dr. Esselstyn explains that these oils and fat sources may contribute to high cholesterol levels, which in turn, may increase your cholesterol levels. You do require some amount of fat in your diet, and the diet recommends having 1 tbsp. of flaxseed each day. This provides heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, offering the amount of fat your body needs to function properly.

Dr. Esselstyn is the father of Rip Esselstyn (Forks over Knives and Engine 2 Engine) he is a cardiologist who has had great success with patients eating his plant based diet.  Rip is a firefighter who has adopted and is doing a real good job of promoting his dad’s diet plan. He says; no avocados, nuts, olive oils all the things that we have been told produce health.  I am more confused.  I think that my decision for me will be to limit my healthy fat.  Make sure that I have that tbsp of flaxseeds every day and curtail the rest.  I will have to go back and check some more.  It seems like it is the cardiologists who have the most rigid and controversial diets.  Adkins, Esselstyn and Agatson are three of those Dr’s and they all have different approaches.

 

Karen Davis, Holistic Health Practitioner says…

Trust your gut.  What feels right for you?  Personally, I eat avocados and peanuts butter almost everyday.  I sometimes cook my vegetables in coconut oil and I love to grab a handful of my homemade trail mix (nuts, berries, seeds and dark chocolate) when I need a mid-day snack.  I suggest you try adding in “healthy” fats and removing some of the “unhealthy” fats and see how you feel.  If you don’t feel an improvement, then begin removing the “healthy” fats as well.  Feel any better?

Be well & inspired!

Karen ~ Your Wellness Warrior

http://www.LifeofICoaching.com

Benefits of Coconut Oil:  Is this really good for me?

coconut

Often, we are told how bad saturated fats are for our health. Whether it is by our doctors or news articles, we are sold just how bad coconut oil is because it is a source of artery-clogging saturated fat.

Well, coconut oil has been criticized when it is actually one of the good fats. It has been used in hospital formulas to feed critically ill patients and is a major component of baby formulas because it provides the same nutrient value as human breast milk. Coconut oil is used to treat a number of common illnesses and considered by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be a safe, natural food.

It was discovered by the people that live in the Islands of the South Pacific that these natives were robust and healthy eating traditional native diets. Heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and arthritis are almost unheard of, but when they abandon their traditional diets for the Western foods, they find that their health deteriorates, and the more the Pacific natives move away from the diet of their ancestors, the closer they come to the diseases of the West like diabetes, gout, obesity, and atherosclerosis.

Time and time again, we are told to limit our fat intake to reduce the risk of heart disease and should consume no more than 30% of our total calorie intake per day.

However, the Polynesian people consume large quantities of fat in the form of coconut oil, as much as 60% of their total calorie intake.

What people do not understand is that there are many types of saturated fats and they affect the body differently. The plant source that is found in coconut oil is different from what is found in animal products.

Coconut oil is used to treat patients that have digestive and malabsorption problems. It is commonly given to infants and small children so that they can digest their fat. Studies show that coconut oil helps to support and strengthen the immune system. The difference is the nature of the fat molecule, which is found in coconut oil. The molecules of all fats and oils are called fatty acids. There are two methods of classifying fatty acids. One is based on the amount of saturation found within fats and oils (saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated). Another way of classifying fats is based on the molecular size or length of the carbon chain within each fatty acid. Within fatty acids there are long chains of carbon atoms with hydrogen atoms attached. They are known as short chain fatty acids (SCFA), medium chain fatty acids (MCFA), and long chain fatty acids (LCFA). Coconut oil is mostly composed of medium chain fatty acids (MCFA), also known as medium chain triglycerides (MCT).

The majority of fats and oils found in our diets, whether they are saturated or unsaturated or come from animals or plant source which are comprised of long chain fatty acids (LCFA). Anywhere from 98 to 100% of all the fatty acids consumed are LCFA.

Be Well & Inspired,

Karen ~ Your Wellness Warrior ❤

http://www.LifeofICoaching.com

THE SKINNY ON FATS

granola

For years, health experts preached that a low-fat diet was the gateway to health. They proclaimed fats as the enemy, linking them to cardiovascular and other diseases. The food industry jumped on this “theory” and bombarded us with fat-free and low-fat “food” options. A walk down the supermarket aisle will confirm our obsession with fat-free foods. To ensure that flavor was not compromised, sugars were added in increasing amounts. So, while our low-fat options exploded, so did obesity rates, as well as other related illnesses. Clearly, low-fat did not deliver the promised results. We now know that healthy fats DO NOT make us fat. In fact, they are one of the three macronutrients, along with carbohydrates and protein, that your body NEEDS to function at optimal levels.  And, truth be told, fats help us stay slim!!

THE WHY

So, why do we need fats in our diets, how much is enough, and what kind of fats should we incorporate into a balance eating plan?

Fats provide essential fatty acids, protect your heart, keep your skin and hair soft and subtle, lubricate your joints, protect your nervous system, and protect cell membranes from inflammation. Fats deliver vitamins A, D, E, and K to your cells and are also are a great source of energizing fuel.  So, you can see that your body really can’t function without them!

THE WHAT

THE BAD FATS:

Let’s take a closer look at the different types of fats. The SAD diet (Standard American Diet) consists mainly of artery-clogging saturated and trans fats. Why? Because they taste so good and are widely available in our food supply. Fats, together with sodium and sugars, enhance the flavors of foods and keep you coming back for more.

Most of us have heard about bad saturated fats. Usually solid at room temperature, these are found in animal products such as meat and diary. New research, however, shows that some saturated fats, such as coconut oil, can be metabolized by the body faster than others, hence they are rarely stored as fat. Trans fats are unsaturated fats that have been altered though the process of hydrogenation to extend their shelf life. These should be avoided at all costs, as they are associated with heart disease and related illnesses (think:   packaged cookies, pastries, muffins, candy bars, and cakes).

Healthy unsaturated fats play a huge role in your overall health and well-being. They are either polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fats and are considered good fats because they help lower cholesterol levels, which can reduce the risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Polyunsaturated fats provide us with essential fatty acids, essential meaning we must get them from our diet as our body does not manufacture them. These fatty acids keep your brain functioning well and aid in the healthy growth and development of your body. Omega-3 fatty acids, found in oily fish such as salmon, tuna, and sardines, as well as flaxseeds, chia seeds, and walnuts, are central to reducing inflammation and heart disease. It’s always best to get your omega-3s from food, but supplement if you need to. Most people get too many omega-6 fatty acids from vegetable oils and margarine. Yikes! Monounsaturated fats are found in peanut butter, nuts, olive oil, sesame oil, and avocado.

For good health and a balanced diet, it is important to get fats from both polyunsaturated and monounsaturated sources. Keep in mind, though, that even the good fats should be eaten in moderation. All fats are calorie dense at 9 calories a gram, so expert guidelines suggest that 20-35 percent of your daily calories come from fat, with no more that 10 percent coming from saturated fats. And remember, the next time you are in the supermarket and spot a fat-free or low-fat label on a food item, take that as a red flag and your cue to run as fast as you can to the fresh produce section!

Delicious Treats Your Taste Buds Will Thank You For

Almond Joys 

1/31/2 C raw honey, to taste

2 to 3 tbsp cocoa powder, to taste

Dash of Celtic sea salt, cinnamon, and vanilla

2 C raw coconut flakes

1 C raw, slivered almonds

Mix the first five ingredients well, then add coconut and almonds. Stir well. Form into little balls and enjoy!

Almond Butter or Walnut Butter or Pecan Butter 

1 C raw almonds, ground

¼- ½ C raw honey

Dash of Celtic sea salt, cinnamon, and vanilla

Blend in the blender until smooth.

The almonds can be replaced with walnuts, pecans, or other raw nuts. Add cocoa powder for chocolate butter. Add raw cacao nibs, Maca powder, and chia seeds for superfoods.

Fruit Leather

Cook homemade applesauce with apples, water, honey, and dash of Celtic sea salt, cinnamon, cloves, and vanilla. Dehydrate the applesauce on a sheet in a dehydrator for 12 hours. Can use alternate fruits such as peace, grape, strawberries, etc.

Sunflower Seed Brittle

1 C raw sunflower seeds

½ C raw coconut chips

2 tbsp sesame seeds

¼ – ½ C honey

Dash of Celtic sea salt, cinnamon, and vanilla

Mix well. Bake in oven for 20-30 min. at 250°F.  Cool and enjoy!

Granola

4 C old-fashioned oats

1 ½ C sliced almonds

½ tsp Celtic sea salt

1 tsp cinnamon

Mix these ingredients well.

¼ C coconut  oil

½ – ¾ C honey

Mix together.

Whisk in 1 tsp. vanilla.

Pour liquid mixture over oat mixture.  Spread in 10×15 bar pan. Bake at 300°F for 40 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes. Add ½ C raisins or dried cranberries when cool.

Dehydrated Fruits & Vegetables

Wash and cut fruit. Place in dehydrator on parchment paper under 115°F for 12 -18 hours.

Enjoy!

Be Well,

Karen ❤

Your Wellness Warrior

http://www.lifeoficoaching.com

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